D-Day: TCM Holds Marathon for Allied Invasion’s 80th Anniversary

Saving Private Ryan, The Longest Day, and two George Stevens documentaries are airing in a TCM D-Day marathon to mark the 80th anniversary.

It was at dawn on June 6, 1944 that the Allied forces set sail across the English Channel in what was a surprise attack. The air campaign provided cover for the arriving land and sea forces. The Nazis were expecting the Allied invasion to land at the Strait of Dover, elsewhere in France. Because of Gen. George Patton not being a part of the main attack, the Nazis were caught off guard. Patton would later make his way over upon taking command of the 3rd U.S. Army. The deception would certainly pave the way for the largest amphibious invasion in military history. In short, D-Day and the Battle of Normandy–which ended in late August 1944–would serve as the beginning of the end for Nazi Germany.

Codenamed Operation Overlord–an operation in the planning for at least two years–the Allied forces would land at the Normandy beaches (Omaha, Utah, Gold, Juno, Sword). After taking the beaches, they would march inland to liberate France. Together with the Soviets, they would also free the rest of Europe from the Nazis. Many troops would lose their lives in the first 24 hours alone. Several thousand would also be dead by the end of the war along. We will forever remember them for their sacrifices.

There’s also some behind-the-scenes drama surrounding George Stevens: D-Day to Berlin. I’ll explain more in my review of the 46-minute film running in the morning. In short, Emmy nominations and wins would be rescinded. If you want to watch and forget to DVR, it’s also available on Max and the Criterion Channel.

George Stevens: D-Day to Berlin
George Stevens: D-Day to Berlin.

The TCM marathon consists of 12 films and starts early. Primetime and late night headliners include Saving Private Ryan and The Longest Day. Alternatively, you can watch the epic Steven Spielberg war film on Paramount+.

The schedule (All times in ET) is as follows:

6:15 AM: Code Name Emerald (1985)

8 AM: The Americanization of Emily (1964)

10 AM: George Stevens: A Filmmaker’s Journey (1984)

12 PM: 36 Hours (1964)

2 PM: Red Ball Express (1952)

3:30 PM: D-Day, The Sixth of June (1956)

5:30 PM: George Stevens: D-Day to Berlin (1994)

6:30 PM: Overlord (1975)

8 PM: Saving Private Ryan (1998)

11 PM: The Longest Day (1962)

Danielle Solzman

Danielle Solzman is native of Louisville, KY, and holds a BA in Public Relations from Northern Kentucky University and a MA in Media Communications from Webster University. She roots for her beloved Kentucky Wildcats, St. Louis Cardinals, Indianapolis Colts, and Boston Celtics. Living less than a mile away from Wrigley Field in Chicago, she is an active reader (sports/entertainment/history/biographies/select fiction) and involved with the Chicago improv scene. She also sees many movies and reviews them. She has previously written for Redbird Rants, Wildcat Blue Nation, and Hidden Remote/Flicksided. From April 2016 through May 2017, her film reviews can be found on Creators.

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