Beckett: Netflix Thriller Fails to Thrill

The point of a thriller movie is to thrill the audience but unfortunately, Beckett fails to do so as the film makes its arrival on Netflix.

While many of us are staying home because of the pandemic, we’re counting on films to take us on a vacation. It could be anywhere from NYC to LA to a location in this film like Greece. Beckett (John David Washington) is an American tourist on vacation in Greece. He soon finds himself in Dr. Richard Kimble’s shoes after an accident when he’s forced to go on the run and sets out to clear his name at the American embassy. It’s easier said than done. Conspiracy theories abound as we get deeper into the film. Beckett isn’t a doctor or covert agent. He’s not the type of person who should be finding himself in this situation. Call it the wrong place at the wrong time but the film just falls flat on so many levels.

For a film that draws some similarities to The Fugitive with the whole man-on-the-run theme, it’s such a disappointment to walk away and feel like the film let you down. Maybe it’s a coincidence that The Fugitive just marked its 28th anniversary last week but now I’m getting sidetracked. But when it comes to the great manhunt films, The Fugitive set high standards. They also borrow ideas here and there from other classic manhunt thrillers such–themes of espionage and politics. And so, it’s a real shame that this film falls so flat in the thrills department. One comes into Beckett with some decent expectations only to find that the expectations simply are not met.

Thrillers should have scenes at set pieces that leave audiences on the edge of their seats. It’s just so unfortunate that this film fails to deliver. I’m a fan of John David Washington’s work and so I was looking forward to seeing the film. Unfortunately, it took all of my self-restraint to stop me from falling asleep during the film. That’s how much the film struggled to keep my attention. Maybe it was my body telling me that I needed more sleep or maybe it just speaks to how Beckett fails on so many levels as a thriller.

John David Washington’s presence alone is not enough save the thrill-less Beckett.

DIRECTOR: Ferdinando Cito Filomarino
SCREENWRITER: Kevin A. Rice
CAST: John David Washington, Boyd Holbrook, Vicky Krieps, Panos Koronis, and Alicia Vikander

Netflix launches Beckett on August 13, 2021.

Danielle Solzman

Danielle Solzman is native of Louisville, KY, and holds a BA in Public Relations from Northern Kentucky University and a MA in Media Communications from Webster University. She roots for her beloved Kentucky Wildcats, St. Louis Cardinals, Indianapolis Colts, and Boston Celtics. Living less than a mile away from Wrigley Field in Chicago, she is an active reader (sports/entertainment/history/biographies/select fiction) and involved with the Chicago improv scene. She also sees many movies and reviews them. She has previously written for Redbird Rants, Wildcat Blue Nation, and Hidden Remote/Flicksided. From April 2016 through May 2017, her film reviews can be found on Creators.

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